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George Spangler Farm & Field Hospital

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In July 1863, a thriving family farm was suddenly transformed as the Union 11th Corps converted the property to a field hospital for more than 1,900 wounded soldiers. Today, the George Spangler Farm & Field Hospital stands as the best surviving example of a corps-level field hospital used during the Battle of Gettysburg. Meticulously renovated, the site features restored, original buildings from the 1863 battle to inspire and explore: The stone farmhouse where George Spangler, his wife Elizabeth and four children lived. The family chose to remain during the battle and ongoing field hospital activities, with all six family members moved to just one room of their house. The Pennsylvania bank barn served as the hospital where both Union and Confederate soldiers received care. The summer kitchen used by the family during the warm Pennsylvania summers. Records indicate this is the place where Confederate General Lewis A. Armistead died from wounds he received during Pickett’s Charge. The site, with living history programming in summer, is open to visitors Friday-Sunday June through mid-August. Admission to the site is included with the purchase of a ticket to the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum & Visitor Center programs and access to the site is free for Friends of Gettysburg members.