« Back to previous page

American Intelligence Activities in the Revolutionary War

George Washington, the Sons of Liberty, and the Battles of Trenton and Yorktown are familiar terms discussed by authors and educators in relation to the Revolutionary War. Behind the operations, however, a new perspective is emerging, driven by the scholarship of Mr. Kenneth A. Daigler, professional intelligence officer.

The U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC) in Carlisle, Pennsylvania will present the second roundtable of the quarterly “Discussions on Military History.” The roundtable will open with a lecture from Mr. Daigler on the American intelligence operations during the Revolution based on his 2014 book, Spies, Patriots, and Traitors: American Intelligence in the Revolutionary War. Following the lecture, Professor of History Dr. James H. Broussard, Archivist Ms. Jessica J. Sheets, and Chief of Interpretation for the George Washington Birthplace National Monument Mr. Scott S. Hill, will discuss how intelligence acts as a new lens on the Revolutionary War.

General George Washington and his vast network of spies engaged in the tradecraft of intelligence collection throughout the Revolutionary War. Washington led such clandestine activities due to his skills of observation, tactical and strategic deception, elicitation, and defensive counterintelligence. As early as the Battle of Trenton, Washington oversaw spies and scouts reconnoitering the enemy’s positions, and his Strategic Deception Plan built upon this success through to the British surrender at Yorktown. Multiple organizations were behind intelligence activities throughout the colonies. Groups such as the United Front Organization encouraged political action and aided inter-colonial communication. Others disguised their activities as legitimate businesses in order to provide weapons and expertise to American Soldiers. Intelligence activities were integral to the colonists’ victory and independence.

Mr. Daigler is a retired Career Operations Officer for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), and worked with the Department of Defense on counterintelligence operations. He is a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and the Vietnam War. Along with his book Spies, Patriots, and Traitors: American Intelligence in the Revolutionary War, Daigler is the author of intelligence articles for numerous journals, including The Intelligencer and Studies in Intelligence. In these works, and others, his research focuses on intelligence activities in the period between 1765 through 1865.

All USAHEC lectures are open to the public and FREE to attend. Parking is free, books for a signing will be for sale, and the Museum Store will be open. For directions, more information, and a complete schedule of USAHEC events, please visit: www.usahec.org or call 717-245-3972.

American Intelligence Activities in the Revolutionary War
  • to
  • U.S. Army Heritage & Education Center
  • George Washington, the Sons of Liberty, and the Battles of Trenton and Yorktown are familiar terms discussed by authors and educators in relation to the Revolutionary War. Behind the operations,