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Pittsburgh’s Famous Stainless Steel Cars Become Featured Exhibit at Antique Auto Museum in Hershey

Published: Sep 23, 2009

ATI Allegheny Ludlum Loans Company Icons In Time for Eastern Regional Fall Meet

Hershey, PA (September 23, 2009) – Jeffrey Bliemeister, Antique Auto Museum Curator today announced that two landmark stainless steel cars on loan from Pittsburgh-based ATI Allegheny Ludlum, an Allegheny Technologies company, will become a featured exhibit at the Antique Auto Museum (AACA Museum) in Hershey for a year. A 1960 Thunderbird and a 1967 Lincoln Continental Convertible will be arriving this week from Pittsburgh in time for the 2009 Antique Automobile Club of America’s Eastern Division National Fall Meet from October 7-10, 2009, featuring the largest antique car flea market, car corral and car show in the country.

In addition to the Pittsburgh cars, other special vehicles on display at the Museum will include an original and unrestored 1911 Olds Limited, 1953 Cadillac LeMans Dream Car #3, GM Futurliner #10, and 1970 Chevelle LS-6 from the 2006 Wisconsin Muscle car find.  Event organizers for the Fall Meet estimate more than 250,000 people will have the opportunity to see the stainless steel cars at the Antique Auto Museum.  The Fall Meet features approximately 1,300 other show cars, over 3,000 vendors and includes nearly 10,000 flea market spots throughout the 300 acre event grounds.

“We are excited to be adding cars with such a deep story of innovation to our 71,000 square foot museum,” said Bliemeister. “The ATI cars are not only beautiful classic cars, but they demonstrate an exciting era of innovation for the steel and auto industries in America.”

In 1935, officials at Allegheny Ludlum Steel Division and the Ford Motor Company collaborated on an experiment that resulted in the creation of stainless steel cars that would be a tribute to stainless steel, one of the most dynamic metals ever developed.   

Allegheny Ludlum, a pioneer producer of stainless steel, proposed the idea of creating a stainless steel car to Ford, leading to the development of a 1936 Deluxe Sedan, that later became the centerpiece of a campaign to expose the public to the new metal and its many uses. 

Later, Allegheny Ludlum and Ford collaborated on the two stainless models, a 1960 Thunderbird and a 1967 Lincoln Continental Convertible that will be on display at the Antique Auto Museum in Hershey from October 2009 through 2010.

Through many years of active use, metallurgists and engineers have been amazed at the superiority of the metal.  As with all stainless steel there is no need for painting. The corrosion-resistant properties of the stainless eliminate the problems caused by rust. 

Since July 1, 1960, when two stainless steel Ford Thunderbirds came off the line in Wixom, Michigan they have each traveled over 100,000 miles promoting the innovative material. With the exception of the body skin, bumpers and grille, which are made of T302 stainless steel, every other component is standard 1960 Thunderbird equipment. Also included is the first T409 solid stainless steel muffler released on a production vehicle. Both cars still have their original mufflers and T304 exhaust pipes after 45 years on the road demonstrating the durability of stainless steel.  T409 is the standard-grade stainless used in auto exhaust systems today.

The 1967 Lincoln Convertible was the last of the stainless steel cars produced by the Ford Motor Company and Allegheny Ludlum Steel.  Except for the vehicle's body, all other parts and equipment on the car are standard for the 1967 Lincoln Convertible. The vehicle's weight is just about equal to one with a standard steel body.  Three stainless Lincolns were built that year. Allegheny Ludlum Steel retains two and still uses them for special events such as the display at the Antique Automobile Club of America Museum in Hershey.

Of the six stainless steel cars that rolled off the Ford assembly line in Detroit in 1936, four exist today as living proof of the durability of stainless steel. Each of the original six logged at least 200,000 miles in the hands of Allegheny Ludlum officials before "retiring" to private ownership in 1946. Thousands of additional miles have been logged on the odometers since, and the shiny bodies have outlasted most of their non-stainless steel parts.

For information on the 2009 Antique Automobile Club of America’s Eastern Division National Fall Meet and accommodations in the Hershey area visit or call the Hershey Harrisburg Regional Visitors Bureau at 1-877-727-8573.

Author: Rick Dunlap

Public Relations Director
Hershey Harrisburg Regional Visitors Bureau
3211 North Front Street, Suite 301 A, Harrisburg, PA 17110
Rick's Twitter 
Cell: 717.884.3328

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